CHAPTER VI

Library Card Catalogue Tables

OVERVIEW

  By the turn of the 21-st century, most libraries in the States had replaced their library card catalogues with computers and were auctioning off their old wooden bureaus. I got ahold of a bunch from the University of California at Berkeley and set about re-inventing them. Aside from the obvious improvement in cabinet design, I have given them the upperhand over their nemesis, the computer, by retrofitting their drawers for archival data storage. Mind, they work for music CDs too.
(PHOTO DESCRIPTION)   Each catalogue table has four to five double-deep drawers that now hold DVDs and CDs. Now then, "Gold", archival quality DVDs (cost:$2) and CDs are rated to last 100 years. So a catalogue table has capacity to archivally store about 4 terrabites (4,000 GB) of data, using gold DVDs and soft sleeves. (Or if music is your thing, CDs in hard case fit 36 to a drawer). Computer hard-drives, on the other hand, may be able to store grand quantities of data too, but the best are only rated to last for five years. Think Tortoise and Hare: the wood library bureau is the toirtoise.
  Most of the wood for sides and tops for the tables were also harvested from U.C. In one, there are pieces of the oak frame from an old psychology department blackboard; another has walnut sections from old law library tables; others incorporate sections of tops, sides, and trestles---quartersawn oak---from old desks. All have original solid brass hardware.

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The Indian carved catalogue table has carved rosewood panels from old Indian screens on the sides and back as well as planted carvings around the edge of the top and around the front.

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Playing off an old Stickley blanket chest design, the Arts & Crafts Light Catalogue Table combines a library bureau from Berkeley with cabinetry of quarter-sawn Oak, Banara, and Alaskan Yellow Cedar.

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Oak and quarter-sawn Oak veneer pieces from old university desks make up the cabinetry of the Persian card catalogue table

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The Roman card catalogue table makes use of legs from an old Philadelphia chair workshop, walnut and walnut veneer parts from old Boalt Hall tables.

(PHOTO DESCRIPTION)
More legs from the same Philadelphia chair workshop and a section of beech veneer top from an old students desk embellish the Parisienne card catalogue table

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At the base of the Morrocan card catalogue table are an original pair of slide-out shelves used in the larger banks of card catalogues.

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The two sides of the trestled Arts & Crafts catalogue table are cut from a single trestle-end desk. Quarter-sawn Oak throughout.

### Claro and Black Walnut are used in the Walnut Arts & Crafts catalogue table. Like it's lighter-wood cousin, it follows on an old Stickley design.

(PHOTO DESCRIPTION) Probably the oldest library bureau I've come across, from around the turn of the 19th century, Yawman & Erbe card catalogue table uses parts of a mid-1900's dining table for legs and top. Drawers not retrofitted.

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Chapter VI : OVERVIEW --- continued

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